Office of Medical Education

Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital Pediatric Residency
Frequently Asked Questions

How did the integration between All Children’s and Johns Hopkins happen?
Is the program distinct from the Hopkins residency program in Baltimore?
How do you think the new residency program will be different from other programs? We keep hearing that the program is going to be innovative. What does that mean?
How is Hopkins going to help grow research at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital?
What’s unique about Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital?
Will students be able to do electives at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital? If so, which ones are available and how do I arrange them?
Are you going to have fellowships? When and which ones?
What kind of students will Johns Hopkins All Children’s Program seek out?
Will you accept international student applications?

How did the integration between All Children’s and Johns Hopkins happen?

All Children’s Hospital has been committed to medical education since it was built in 1920. In recent years, All Children’s Hospital wanted to grow its educational programs to include the spectrum of medical education from students, to residents, to fellows and to promote excellence in education.

At the same time, Johns Hopkins Medicine had begun to grow its tripartite mission in patient care, education and research beyond the state of Maryland. The leadership at Johns Hopkins Medicine found an immense opportunity in All Children’s Hopsital’s clinical strengths and educational experiences where both institutions could benefit in their expanding vision toward excellence. The decision to have All Children’s Hospital become the first fully academically integrated hospital within Johns Hopkins Medicine outside of the Maryland/Washington DC region was announced on April 1, 2011.

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Is the program distinct from the Hopkins residency program in Baltimore?

Yes. The Johns Hopkins All Children’s Pediatric Residency Program in St. Petersburg-Tampa, Florida is accredited by the ACGME as a separate program from the Johns Hopkins Pediatric Residency Program in Baltimore and therefore requires a separate ERAS application for the NRMP match in pediatrics.

Although we are distinct programs, residents in either program will benefit from the strengths of each institution’s facilities and faculty, including through rotations.

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How do you think the new residency program will be different from other programs? We keep hearing that the program is going to be innovative. What does that mean?

The Johns Hopkins All Children’s Pediatric Residency will be educationally driven, and not service driven, unlike other residency programs. This will allow enhanced opportunities for residents to explore interests and participate in unique educational programs such as our LEAD curriculum, simulation enhanced activities and other programs.

The focus of the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Pediatric residency will be to train excellent pediatricians that will be prepared for the changing world of healthcare. An emphasis on the following innovative topics will allow for our residents to lead the next generation of pediatric healthcare:

  • Genes to Society and Individualized Medicine
  • Ethics of Healthcare 
  • Business of Medicine 
  • Continuous Quality Improvement and Safety
  • Competence in Diversity of Care
  • Leadership

Residents in our program will also have early and frequent opportunities to be a part of clinical research programs under mentorship of Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine faculty. The Clinical and Translational Research Organization (CTRO) will allow for large population studies as well as more focused clinical research studies to be initiated and thus, facilitate residents’ involvement in these projects during their training. The CTRO will also provide expertise in study design, research methodology and analysis as well as research ethics knowledge that will train and prepare residents to be involved in successful research projects.

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How is Hopkins going to help grow research at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital?

The recently established CTRO will provide abundant opportunities and resources for Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital physicians and trainees to embark on innovative research projects.

In addition, a biorepository of patient information and specimens is being created to enhance the mission of research within Johns Hopkins Medicine.

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What’s unique about Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital?

Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital is a state of the art free-standing children’s hospital. The new hospital and outpatient center opened in 2010.

Click here to see the time-lapse video of the hospital construction.

The hospital includes 259 beds. Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital is a tertiary care hospital for the entire west coast of Florida including a 17 county area in the region.

Our 97-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit is a Level IV NICU as defined by the American Academy of Pediatrics

  • 22-bed Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit with adjoining cardiac surgery and catheterization suites
  • 28-bed Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
  • 28-bed Neurosurgery & Surgery Unit
  • 56-bed Pediatric Medicine floor
  • 28-bed Vincent Lecavalier Pediatric Cancer and Blood Disorders Center
  • 28-bed Pediatric Emergency Center
  • Outpatient Dialysis Unit
  • Outpatient Infusion Center


Its state of the art design, described in a recent paper “Clinical Self-Sufficiency Planning”, highlights the vision for Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital to be fully prepared for weather related disasters or other emergencies thus striving to protect its patients, staff and region. The hospitals facilities and resources in disaster preparedness make it unique in the region in the country. Click here to access the paper.

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Will students be able to do electives at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital? If so, which ones are available and how do I arrange them?

We welcome interested students to complete clinical and research electives at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital. Please click here to learn more about these opportunities and our application process.

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Are you going to have fellowships? When and which ones?

As part of the educational vision for Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital, there will be fellowships developed in a variety of subspecialties that will highlight the clinical strengths of Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital. Currently, the following fellowships have been inaugurated:

In the coming years, the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital Office of Medical Education will be working with faculty and Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital leadership to inaugurate other quality fellowships. Please stay tuned to our website for news on the development of new fellowships.

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What kind of students will Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital Program seek out?

We invite all interested medical students from around the world to apply to our new pediatric residency program. All applicants will be reviewed. Decisions regarding invitations to interview with the program are based on candidates’ qualifications, accomplishments and potential fit within the program.

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Will you accept international student applications? 

See our application requirements.

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Office of Medical Education
Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital
601 Fifth Street South, Suite 608
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
Phone: (727) 767-4106
Fax: (727) 767-8804

Contact us

Johns Hopkins Medicine has worked very closely with All Children's to create the nation’s most outstanding academic environment for pediatrics.

Jonathan Ellen, MD
President and Vice Dean for All Children's Hospital

For somebody who is unsure or undecided, which is expected during residency, you want to be given all the doors and All Children’s really has all the doors.

Raquel Hernandez MD, MPH
Director of Medical Education ACH JHM
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine