Office of Medical Education

Frequently Asked Questions

How many fellows are in the program?
Is the pediatric surgery training program at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital related to the Johns Hopkins/University of Maryland training program in Baltimore?
What is your accreditation status?
What are your case volumes?
What is the call schedule?
Am I “protected” while on call?
How much vacation time is given to a fellow?
Does the program support the fellows attending professional meetings and courses?
Does the fellow have an office, a call room, parking, etc.?
Is the fellow allowed to moonlight?
Who does the foreign bodies?
Are there cases or service lines not part of the pediatric surgery fellow’s training experience?
Who manages the NICU patients?
Who manages the PICU patients?
Why do the fellows rotate onto the urology service?
Why do the fellows rotate on the gastroenterology service?
Do the pediatric hospitalists admit surgery patients?

How many fellows are in the program?

We match one fellow per year so that we have a junior and senior fellow.

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Is the pediatric surgery training program at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital related to the Johns Hopkins/University of Maryland training program in Baltimore?

The programs are separate. Both are training programs of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. There are some shared teleconferences and research opportunities between the Baltimore and St. Petersburg services, but each program carries its own accreditation from the ACGME.

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What is your accreditation status?

Our status is “Continued accreditation” ---which is the most secure status possible. We were site surveyed in the summer of 2016. Those findings were presented to the RRC in the fall. We were moved up from Initial accreditation to “Continued accreditation” and have no warnings.

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What are your case volumes?

Our first graduate met all required case minimums and exceeded national averages in half of the categories. Our current second year fellow is on track to do the same.

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What is the call schedule?

Every other from home. Fellows alternate weekends. If the research fellow(s) has adequate experience and competence to handle fellow-level call, then the research fellow will also participate.Every other from home. Fellows alternate weekends. If the research fellow(s) has adequate experience and competence to handle fellow-level call, then the research fellow will also participate.

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Am I “protected” while on call?

While the fellow is ultimately responsible for the pediatric surgery patients at all times, the service is staffed 24/7 by either in-house advanced practice providers or residents. These individuals handle first line calls.

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How much vacation time is given to a fellow?

The fellow may take up to four weeks of paid vacation per year.

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Does the program support the fellows attending professional meetings and courses?

The program will send the fellow to one professional meeting per year (approved in advance by the Program Director) and to specialized courses (MIS, Oncology, Colo-rectal) if the Program Director judges it to be important for the fellow’s professional development. The fellow will also be supported if his/her scholarly activity is accepted for presentation at professional meetings (approved in advance by the Program Director). Any time away for professional functions or interviewing is subject to ACGME/RRC rules regarding program training length and vacation time.

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Does the fellow have an office, a call room, parking, etc.?

The fellow is provided with an office, desk, couch, computer and software necessary to perform his or her duties. This office is located adjacent to the faculty offices in the Division of Pediatric Surgery. The fellow has access to a sleep room which includes a desk, computer, private bath and shower. It is located on the fourth floor of the hospital. The fellow is provided covered parking in the on-campus garage. The fellow is also provided emergency outdoor parking immediately adjacent to the Emergency Center Trauma Bay when responding from home for emergent patient care issues. Hot breakfast and lunch and 24 hour snacks/beverages are available to the fellow at no charge.

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Is the fellow allowed to moonlight?

While the institution has a policy that allows trainees to moonlight, moonlighting by fellows in the Division of Pediatric Surgery is flatly discouraged and must be done in compliance with ACGME work hour restrictions. Any moonlighting must be approved in advance by the Program Director.

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Who does the foreign bodies?

The GI service takes call for esophageal foreign bodies. The pediatric surgery fellow covers these cases. There are no trainees on the GI service competing for these cases. Airway foreign bodies are handled by either ENT (with whom the pediatric surgery fellow can scrub) or by the pediatric surgical service.

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Are there cases or service lines not part of the pediatric surgery fellow’s training experience?

Our institution does not perform liver, kidney, pancreas or small bowel transplantation. We also transfer major burns to a regional burn center.

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Who manages the NICU patients?

Patients admitted to the NICU are co-managed with the neonatologists. The pediatric surgery service leads the discussion of the daily plan in terms of ventilator management, fluids, nutrition and medications. Routine adjustments to ventilator settings or fluids/pressors will be handled by the neonatology service. The fellow spends one month rotating in the NICU early during the fellowship to help develop a good working relationship with the neonatal team. During this month, the fellow will have primary responsibility for minute-to-minute care of the critically ill neonate.

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Who manages the PICU patients?

Patients admitted to the PICU remain on the surgery service with a consult to the critical care team. Much like in the NICU, the pediatric surgery service leads the discussion of the daily plan in terms of ventilator management, fluids, nutrition and medications. Routine adjustments to ventilator settings or fluids/pressors will be handled by the critical care service. The fellow spends one month rotating in the PICU early during the fellowship to help develop a good working relationship with the critical care team. During this month, the fellow will have primary responsibility for minute-to-minute care of the critically ill child.

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Why do the fellows rotate onto the urology service?

The Pediatric Surgery service handles all kidney tumors and provides sufficient case volume for the fellow to reach his case number requirements. However, the urology service performs a high volume of basic urologic cases as well as unique cases not performed by the pediatric surgery staff (e.g., pyeloplasties, ureteral reimplants, hypospadias repair, endoscopic procedures). Since there are no urology residents or fellows at the institution, the pediatric surgery fellow has an opportunity to have an in-depth experience with the pediatric urologist and also continue to work with them through the remainder of the fellowship when interesting cases arise.

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Why do the fellows rotate on the gastroenterology service?

The fellow can reach all minimum case numbers for GI endoscopy while on the pediatric surgery service, but the GI rotation allows a focused experience with pediatric upper and lower endoscopy with a high volume pediatric gastroenterology service. In addition, since the pediatric surgery service and the gastroenterology service manage many patients together, there is an advantage for the fellow to work closely with them.

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Do the pediatric hospitalists admit surgery patients?

No, surgery patients are admitted to the surgery service. However, the pediatric hospitalist service is a great resource in helping to manage medically complex children. In addition, the hospitalist service will often take pediatric patients onto their service if the surgical condition has been resolved but the patient is not medically or socially ready for discharge.

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Office of Medical Education
Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital
601 Fifth Street South, Suite 608
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
Phone: (727) 767-4106
Fax: (727) 767-8804

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Johns Hopkins Medicine has worked very closely with All Children's to create the nation�s most outstanding academic environment for pediatrics.

Jonathan Ellen, MD
President and Vice Dean for All Children's Hospital

For somebody who is unsure or undecided, which is expected during residency, you want to be given all the doors and All Children�s really has all the doors.

Raquel Hernandez MD, MPH
Director of Medical Education ACH JHM
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
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